Reviewing the Past

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Following are articles as they appeared in the Ranger-Review, the Dawson County Review, and Glendive Independent, 25, 50 & 100 years ago this month.

25 Years Ago

Montana officials are calling for an investigation of the Federal Grain Inspection Service (FGIS) because of a mistake that could cost Montana farmers and elevator operators millions of dollars.

According to a press release from Sen. Conrad Burns, R-Mont., the FGIS announced on Jan. 3 that it had “miscalibrated” the “whole grain analyzer instruments” so that they measure the protein level of wheat from 0.1 to 0.5 percent below its actual level.

According to Tom Johnson, manager of the Grain Growers Elevator in Glendive, the miscalibration may have caused farmers and people who handle grain to lose significant amounts of money.

“I think everybody is going to be hurting on this –– from the export terminals down to the farmer,” he said, but he added that farmers probably lost the bulk of the money.

“At one time, it could have been 50 to 60 cents a bushel,” Johnson said.

-----Janell Holas, Bobby Wurm, Chelsea Bunn, Jennifer Yakel and Elizabeth Bruno made a commercial that was part of a creative learning project done by students in one of Mrs. Stansbury’s STEP classes. The project produced a “newscast from the past” and involved the students in historical research of the San Francisco earthquake in the early part of this century, designing appropriate commercials, and building the props for all aspects of the production.

-----Vic Arneson of House of Color from Bismarck, N.D., began the tile-laying job at the Makoshika State Park visitors center According to Arneson, the 1,000-square-foot tiling job he will be performing will be very time consuming, due to a floor plan that has a multitude of cut angles. The center should be completed this winter, with the official opening slated for Buzzard Day in April. The center will include interpretive displays and a triceratops skull that was excavated from the park.

-----Janell Holas, Bobby Wurm, Chelsea Bunn, Jennifer Yakel and Elizabeth Bruno made a commercial that was part of a creative learning project done by students in one of Mrs. Stansbury’s STEP classes. The project produced a “newscast from the past” and involved the students in historical research of the San Francisco earthquake in the early part of this century, designing appropriate commercials, and building the props for all aspects of the production.

50 Years Ago

The plight of the pregnant, unmarried high school girl is a poignant one, rendered more so by the fact that society tends to make an outcast of her. All too often she drops --or is forced--out of school. Thus begins a cycle which, as a Yale research team recently found, “consists of a failure to change education, dependence on the state welfare system, never marrying and continuing to produce illegitimate offspring.

Lately, though, some of the nation’s larger cities and school systems have been moved to conclude that both compassion and common sense suggest a more constructive approach to the problem. And they’re doing something about it.

In the Sequoia Union High School District at Redwood City, Calif., for instance, a special program has been set up for pregnant teenagers. It operated at first in space donated by an Episcopal church. Now it’s in rented quarters while a permanent facility is being built.

The idea is three-fold: To give the young girls the help they desperately need, to prevent repeat out-ofwedlock pregnancies, and to help unwed mothers make a sound adjustment to their new lives.

-----Past presidents of the Glendive Jayceens were honored during the Jayceens’ celebration of their 16th birthday with a tea for members and past members at the courthouse community room.

Jayceen president Donna Gaub pinned a corsage on the first Jayceen president, Marion Fulton while Jo Murray, program chairman, pinned a corsage on Dolores Guenzi, a past president and 14-year member of the organization.

100 Years Ago

WINTER WHEAT CROP

LARGEST EVER SOWN

Growing Season Was Ideal

Washington, Dec. 17. ––– A huge winter wheat crop, larger by 80 million bushels than any yield in the history of American agriculture, was forecast yesterday by the department of agriculture. The government’s appeal, made before the coming of peace was in sight, saying an acreage of 47,500,000 was desirable, and the guaranteed prices of $2.20 a bushel for wheat, stimulated extraordinary efforts on the part of farmers, said the department’s announcement. As a result 49,027,000 acres were planted during a long and almost perfect season.

Heavy Yields Promised.

The fall growing season has been one of the finest ever known, resulting in the crop being in the best condition ever recorded on Dec. 1 and giving promise of heavy yields.

Allowing for the average spring abandonment of acres due to winter killing, the department announced that winter wheat gives promise of a total production of 76,000,000 bushels. An average spring wheat crop would place next year’s production of wheat beyond a billion bushels and exceed the crop of 1915. Last year’s spring wheat production was 368,000,000 bushels.

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